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yahoo lottery scams

Examples of Fraud

Instagram Spam

Scammers are reaching out to Lottery Instagram subscribers and posing as the Lottery! Be sure to manage your privacy settings so that your information will not be accessible to these individuals. When on the Lottery’s Instagram page, a scammer only needs to click on subscribers to see everyone that has not set their privacy settings to private. It’s good practice to do this across all social media platforms that you use. Be aware! We will never contact you about winning a prize via Instagram.

If you receive a notification like the one that follows, it is a scam. The Colorado Lottery does not notify winners in this way.

Overseas Scam

Players are getting a call from an overseas telephone number (prefix 876) and being asked why they haven’t claimed their winnings. This is a SCAM.

The only time the Lottery Drawing Manager will contact a winner is for Bonus Draws and will always identify herself and ask you to come claim at one of the four Lottery Claims Offices. A representative from the Lottery will never contact you unsolicited.

The Lottery will never ask you to give us up-front money to process your claim.

E-Mail Lottery – Canada & Powerball Scam

There is an email scam that is claiming that the recipient is the winner of E-MAIL LOTTERY, held in Canada, in “conjunction” with Powerball Lottery. In order to claim the prize, the recipient is asked to contact a representative in South Africa and provide personal information. DO NOT REPLY TO THIS SCAM.

This is a documented scam and has been reported to the Federal Trade Commission and MUSL for Powerball.

To view a copy of the letter and other examples of letters and notices that are scams, see below. Check back often to be in the know.

2019 Mega Lottery Picker Scam

People are receiving letters that are addressed to them informing them that they have won millions in the 2019 Mega Lottery Picker. In order to claim the prize, the recipient is asked to travel to Madrid, Spain to claim the check, or to pay a “fee” for diplomatic delivery of the check. This letter is mailed from Lisbon, Portugal. The email address in the letter, [email protected], is an indicator of its non-official capacity. DO NOT REPLY TO THIS SCAM.

This is a documented scam and has been reported to the Federal Trade Commission and the Mega Millions Lottery.

Facebook Scam

Scammers may contact you via private message on Facebook — don’t be fooled! Some scammers even appear to have a local phone number, which is called “spoofing”.

Previous Colorado Winner Scam

A new scam may feature someone claiming to be a previous Colorado Lottery winner.
Do not engage with anyone over email or phone that you do not know, and do not give out any of your personal information.

Social Media Scam

A common phishing scam involves social media. A legitimate Lottery will never reach out to customers in this way. If you did not buy a ticket, you did not win money.

Please do not engage with scammers, and above all, do not give them any personal identifying information. Feel free to report such activity to www.ic3.gov.

Mega Millions Scam

The latest scam involves Mega Millions. Do not be fooled.

About / Protect Yourself / Examples of Fraud

Yahoo lottery scam: Conmen ordered to pay net firm $610m

Struggling net firm Yahoo has won a bumper payout from a lottery but may never see the cash swell its bank account.

A US court has ordered conmen who ran a fake lottery using Yahoo’s name to pay the net firm $610m (ВЈ388m).

The scam involved emailing people telling them they had won a prize in Yahoo lottery.

Victims handed over personal details to receive cash prizes but had their bank accounts plundered instead.

Cash call

Some of those caught out by the conmen handed over cash for supposed processing fees or postal charges for prizes that did not exist.

The judgement awarded against the spammers included $27m for trademark infringement and $583m for breaking US laws on sending junk mail.

Yahoo first took legal action in 2008 against individuals and companies in Thailand and Nigeria suspected of running the fake lottery. Almost 12 million emails were believed to have been sent as part of the hoax.

Documents spelling out the judge’s decision said Yahoo’s allegations were “uncontroverted”.

Despite the court case going in Yahoo’s favour, US Judge Laura Taylor Swain expressed doubt that any money would be collected from the spammers.

“Defendants have never responded in this action or appeared before the court, much less co-operated with the court,” she wrote.

Struggling net firm Yahoo wins a bumper payout from a lottery but may never see the cash swell its bank account.