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Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

2019-2020 DRAW HUNT RESULTS ARE UP!

Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

Get your pet out of a trap and trail safety –

It is that time of year again. Winter is here, trails are set throughout much of Alaska, and a multitude of people are outdoors pursuing their favorite activities, including trapping.

No one wants to see a dog caught in a trap intended for a wild animal, but it occasionally happens. Many of Alaska’s communities are adjacent to prime wildlife habitat. Trappers are drawn to these areas, as are dog walkers, snowmachine riders and hikers/ skiers.

For some great information about trapping regulations, trail recognition, and how to get your pet out of a trap in an unfortunate instance, visit our Sharing the Trails Page.

Watch ADF&G’s detailed, “How to get your pet out of a trap” videos and the “Sharing Alaska’s Trails” video by the Alaska Trappers Association.

You can also download our handy Trap Safety for Pet Owners brochure.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

December 2nd, 7:00PM
Marian Snively of ADF&G shares tips and tricks for identifying and enjoying the hearty birds who stick around South Central AK through the winter.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

Track Tuesday – Lynx on the move

There are lots of reports of lynx sightings recently. Their numbers are up and snowshoe hares are on the way down. Lynx are traveling and looking for food.

Look at these pictures. Lynx have large feet! That is why some people mistake them for Mt. Lion tracks. These pics are from the same animal. Look at how much they can splay their toes going from hard snow to powdery snow. Also, note the stride length of about 42 inches (this lynx was probably trotting – longer than what their usual walking gait would produce).

The lynx tracks crossed the path of some hare tracks of relatively similar age. The lynx only sunk into the deep, powdery snow a little more than the hare. Note: if this was a Mt. lion it would be sinking deep into this powder. Take note of all the clues when you are out there.

Join us for a (free!) virtual Alaskans Afield class via Zoom about animal tracks in winter with Wildlife Education Specialist Mike Taras. Learn how to identify various animal tracks, understand animal gaits and their resulting track patterns, and start reading the stories that are written in the snow.

2019-2020 DRAW HUNT RESULTS ARE UP! Are you a winner? Find out at http://www.drawresults.adfg.alaska.gov/DrawResults/

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Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

2018-19 DRAW HUNT RESULTS ARE UP!
Are you a winner? Find out at http://www.drawresults.adfg.alaska.gov/DrawResults/

Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

Get your pet out of a trap and trail safety –

It is that time of year again. Winter is here, trails are set throughout much of Alaska, and a multitude of people are outdoors pursuing their favorite activities, including trapping.

No one wants to see a dog caught in a trap intended for a wild animal, but it occasionally happens. Many of Alaska’s communities are adjacent to prime wildlife habitat. Trappers are drawn to these areas, as are dog walkers, snowmachine riders and hikers/ skiers.

For some great information about trapping regulations, trail recognition, and how to get your pet out of a trap in an unfortunate instance, visit our Sharing the Trails Page.

Watch ADF&G’s detailed, “How to get your pet out of a trap” videos and the “Sharing Alaska’s Trails” video by the Alaska Trappers Association.

You can also download our handy Trap Safety for Pet Owners brochure.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

December 2nd, 7:00PM
Marian Snively of ADF&G shares tips and tricks for identifying and enjoying the hearty birds who stick around South Central AK through the winter.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game – Official

Track Tuesday – Lynx on the move

There are lots of reports of lynx sightings recently. Their numbers are up and snowshoe hares are on the way down. Lynx are traveling and looking for food.

Look at these pictures. Lynx have large feet! That is why some people mistake them for Mt. Lion tracks. These pics are from the same animal. Look at how much they can splay their toes going from hard snow to powdery snow. Also, note the stride length of about 42 inches (this lynx was probably trotting – longer than what their usual walking gait would produce).

The lynx tracks crossed the path of some hare tracks of relatively similar age. The lynx only sunk into the deep, powdery snow a little more than the hare. Note: if this was a Mt. lion it would be sinking deep into this powder. Take note of all the clues when you are out there.

Join us for a (free!) virtual Alaskans Afield class via Zoom about animal tracks in winter with Wildlife Education Specialist Mike Taras. Learn how to identify various animal tracks, understand animal gaits and their resulting track patterns, and start reading the stories that are written in the snow.

2018-19 DRAW HUNT RESULTS ARE UP! Are you a winner? Find out at http://www.drawresults.adfg.alaska.gov/DrawResults/ ]]>